Sarah Blake LaRose (3kitties) wrote,
Sarah Blake LaRose
3kitties

  • Mood:
  • Music:

more weather observations


It's quiet here in Indiana now; but it's not quiet elsewhere in the country, and my mind is on weather. That means I am going to unleash my thoughts here...





As of 8 p.m., 31 tornadoes had been reported, and there had been more than 300 reports of hail, with stones of more than 4 inches in diameter, said CNN Meteorologist Reynolds Wolf. ...



Multiple tornado warnings continued to bloom Friday night across Tennessee, Mississippi and Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky and Virginia. Previously, warnings were issued in Ohio, Indiana and Louisiana. (



Forecasters said there is a 60 percent probability of a tornado in the area encompassing northeast Mississippi, northern Alabama and southern Tennessee.



"Several long-lived, violent tornadoes now appear increasingly likely," the prediction center states.



"The threat of strong to violent tornadoes will continue" as intense supercell thunderstorms move to the east and northeast across southern Tennessee, northern Alabama and possibly as far east as northwestern Georgia, forecasters said. ...





I will be interested to see what shows up on top of CNN tomorrow... While surfing the 360 Degrees blog, I came across some interesting perspectives on last week's tornadoes in TN, especially in light of my last entry... I talked about feeling less stressed about tornadoes than I did about hurricanes... I am certain that my feelings are colored significantly by the impact of my disabilities, and particularly my blindness and inability to drive, as well as by the fact that I am unemployed and unmarried. However, my perspective regarding what is valuable and what is truly irreplaceable is also significant; and I've had a long time to think about this--my first experience with hurricane preparation and evacuation occurred when I was 16 years old. What matters most to me is my work in progress and my old family recordings, pictures, and writings. I've converted most of these things to digital format and am continuing this process gradually. Everything is stored on an external hard drive. If I had to escape with one thing, that's it. Eventually I can replace most anything else--or accept the losses.





Yesterday, I drove with Sheriff Jeff Holt through the neighborhoods leveled by the storm. These weren't neighborhoods with flimsy, mobile home structures. The houses that were disintegrated by this tornado were skillfully constructed and made of brick. So when you see wide open fields where 15 houses once stood and all that's left are the foundations, you can imagine how vicious this storm must have been.



Tornadoes, to me at least, are the most frightening storms to cover. Relatively speaking, you have time to prepare for hurricanes. But the people who were killed by these tornadoes only had a few final, frantic moments to take cover. In seconds, their homes disappeared.



When I was with Sheriff Holt yesterday, I asked him what the worst part of the storm had been for him. I could tell he was fighting back the emotion when he said he would never forget the face of an 11-month-old boy who was killed by the tornado. ... [Posted By Ed Lavandera, CNN Correspondent: 9:50 AM]



Not to downplay the destruction that occured, but most modern brick homes are not as solid as you think. Most brick today is just brick siding. It serves no structural purpose and wraps around a simple wood frame building. Old buildings are built of brick that is very thick and serves a load bearing, structural
purpose.



Keep this in mind when you think you are secure in your modern brick home. [Posted By Tim Richards, Atlanta, GA : 1:09 PM]



Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 0 comments